Saturday, November 10, 2012



Malayalee Mindset

Speaking the last word on the theme of transforming mindsets, I would like to look at the Malayalee mindset and see what transformation is needed to make ourselves more modern, productive, and closer to universal norms of behavior. We are generally sharper in intellect, more creative and more innovative than many people. We have had the opportunity to interact with many cultures for centuries and even today we have greater global reach than many others. But the paradox is that there is much in our mindset that needs attention and correction, much in our ways that baffles others. It is said that any observation you make on India, the opposite of it will also be true and we should bear in mind that this is so also about Kerala.

The paradox is explained in a story of a bane and a boon. The bane of the Malayalees at the time of their creation was that they were dull, disorganized and lazy, although they were in an enchanting land. They complained bitterly to the Almighty, who gave them a boon that they would be perfect once they took off from Kerala and settled abroad. So we have two kinds of Malayalees, according to this tale, one that remains with the bane in Kerala, undisciplined and lazy, the other, the beneficiaries of the boon, courteous and industrious, in other lands. The story may be apocryphal, but it underlines the fact that the Malayalees are capable of changing their mindset and mend their ways to be successful outside Kerala. They are trusted and depended upon in countries from Mauritius to Malaysia, from the Gulf to the Americas. The joke in Malaysia was that the name of their airline, MAS, stood for “Malayalees Are Supreme.”

The story of the Kerala crabs is well known. They are exported in open cans, as no crab will allow another to climb up in any circumstance. We are highly individualistic, incapable of working as a team. Our superb intellect and creative energy are frittered away in internal squabbles. We are all chiefs, not Indians, as Americans would say. For a society to develop, it has to operate within which each of us has a niche. We have to learn to wait for our turn, whether we are entering an elevator or waiting to help ourselves to a buffet. We must learn from our brethren, who patiently wait in line at the beverage corporation stalls.

Social graces are generally absent in our society. We may be the only people in the world, who do not greet each other as a matter of routine. Most societies develop set phrases, to greet when they meet. Japan has a whole set of traditional expressions for every occasion to show courtesy and humility. But among us, the greeting is, at best, a smile or, at worst, a personal comment, which often shows lack of sensitivity. Gratitude is rarely expressed in Malayalam and, at best, we resort to a casual “thank you”. No Malayalam word exists even for “cheers”, though we drink Indian made foreign liquor in huge quantities. The British talk about the weather to break the ice, but we do not do it, perhaps because we have no variety in weather conditions. We need to cultivate social graces within our own society, not just outside it.

Kerala women are liberated and control the purse strings in the family, but their place is in the home. Wives are not seen or heard in public. Given a choice, we will still make them walk 30 yards behind us. True liberation will come when women are able to come out of the homes safely and occupy positions beside their men in any area of activity. Michelle Obama should be the role model for Kerala women.

Malayalees have gone global, but we remain insular in our own state and resist the winds of change. Outsiders are uncomfortable here because we tend to ignore them on social occasions after an initial introduction and resume our gossip in the vernacular. Partly, it is the inadequacy of language; partly it is lack of confidence. For a people, who have been successful abroad in various professions, we are often tongue-tied when the conversation is in English. Our students have no opportunities to speak in English, not at home, not in class, not among friends and so we remain perpetually handicapped in articulation. Finishing schools and instant English courses do not seem to have raised the general level of proficiency in English. I have seen our people, not being able to express themselves adequately even after living abroad for several years. This is more a matter of mindset, which can be changed, not a mental block. We are not poor in learning languages; we remain poor in using them.

Swami Vivekananda’s “lunatic asylum” is alive and well in Kerala even today. Religions, castes and sub-castes still divide us and the trend is to perpetuate and deepen the divisions, not to discard them. How come that education, economic development and social growth do not erase caste prejudices and practices? Caste, which was once a tool to protect the social fabric and to foster traditional professions, appears to have penetrated the psyche of our being. It strikes at the very root of democracy. We do not cast our votes, we vote our castes. The caste mindset will stay with us as long as it determines our social status, our job opportunities and our loyalties. But Kerala cannot become an egalitarian society, unless we get over our caste mindset.

There appears to be a new explosion of faith. Are we turning more and more to the Gods as we have no faith in our fellow men? Temples, churches and mosques have sprung up everywhere, as if in competition. Religious rituals are no more private between man and his God, but conspicuous display of devotion, a few degrees higher than the competitors. The aim is not to reach heaven anymore, but the Guinness Book of Records. Religious tolerance, a hallmark of Kerala in the past, is fast disappearing from our land. Even Mahabali is greeted with splurging, drinking and Bollywood talk.

The quest for leadership and public recognition must be a weakness of all human beings, but Malayalees seem to have an overdose of it. That explains the proliferation of political parties, organisations and associations. The saying goes that where there are two Malayalees, there is an association, where there are three, there are two associations, where there are four, there is a federation of associations. It is the pursuit of positions that prompts this pointless proliferation of institutions. The waste of energy and resources in our society must be phenomenal in our quest for visibility. We have an infinite infatuation for the camera at every level and the media exploits it merrily. The new tendency to put up huge flex boards of leaders, big and small, in every square and circle, must be curbed. When every one knows that the persons who are featured often finance the flex boards, what purpose do they serve? Thank God, we do not go for gigantic cut outs of leaders like in a neighboring state.

This is the same mindset that results in the immense waste of resources, time and money in our ritualistic public meetings. Any occasion is good enough for a public meeting at any time of the day and you find enough people to line up on the stage and even to occupy the front seats as fodder for verbal canons. Long welcome speeches and several felicitation remarks detract from the substance of the occasion. Speakers are selected to give them honorable appearances and not to make a contribution. Money is spent on flowers covered in plastic sheets and crude metal, glass and wood souvenirs. Unless a code of conduct is established for public meetings, much energy and resources will be wasted on them, as they do in authoritarian states. In Kenya, a hundred senior most officials would go to every meeting that the President addresses and the state machinery comes to a grinding halt. Should we have the same mindset? In the power hungry Kerala, do we need thousands of bulbs burning every time a festival passes by?

Civic sense is also a matter of mindset. Being clean ourselves, while polluting the neighborhood is classic hypocrisy. Same is the case with polluting rivers, destroying forests or turning streets into toilets. Cleanliness must be as much in the mind as in our surroundings.

Another bane of our society is the overdose of ideologies. Some of us still open our umbrellas as soon as it rains in Beijing. We are the only people who closed our shops when Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden were killed. Strikes, hartals etc are still common and the consciousness is only of the rights of workers, not their responsibilities. The institution of “looking charges” should put any labour movement to shame.

Attachment to land is an obsession, not even a mindset. We kill each other for a strip of land. We are perpetually in narrow streets and inadequate civic facilities as no one parts with land even for the common good. The Malayalam University cannot get land in Ezhuthachan’s village. The same mindset thwarts proposals for industrialization. Every potential investor is suspected to be a land grabber. The lust for land skews land utilization. It is true, as Mark Twain said, land is not made any more, but judicious use of available land is essential for Kerala’s development.

In making my case for transforming the Malayalee mindset, I may have exaggerated facts, generalized isolated tendencies and caused offence. But I have not spoken as an outsider, but someone who may have the same mindset that I am seeking to transform. This was more introspection than criticism. Changes in mindset are hard to accomplish in a clean sweep. In the meantime Malayalees must be given tasks that suit their mindset and genius. Give them jobs that demand personal initiative, not collective action. Exploit them in ways that their intellectual talents and rich imagination is put to good use. Trust them to build a knowledge society and usher in a silent revolution. But if Malaylees can transform their mindset, the sky is the limit for them. If we add social graces such as courtesy, discipline and punctuality, social responsibility and industry to the other remarkable attributes of the Malayalees, we will get a productive work force, an impeccable society and a proud community. And then, as Mahakavi Vallathol said, “When we hear the name Kerala, blood will simmer in our veins.”

19 comments:

Renju Raveendran said...

Agree to your views very much sir. Malayalee is a rare species in the human race. Arrogant and presumptuous , suffers from a huge and readily bruisable ego. Oneupmanship and backstabbing are the other sine a qua nones. However these negatives vanish once they set foot on a foreign land. Perhaps they undergo a genetic reengineering.
Renju raveendran .trivandrum.

soman56-uk said...

dear Sreenivasan

A well worked out study, and I fully agree with your views.
So much in life never wanted to be associated with the malayalee community due their arrogance, backbiting and unpolitness.
This phenomeneon is not only in Kerala but around the globe.
more noticeable in the Gulf region because of the sudden wealth acquired.

Arrogance and backbiting occures in advanced counties like USA, UK, Europe.
Though a malayalee by birth keep the Mallus out of sight.

Soman - London

Opinionated said...

What an utterly ridiculous piece of “thinking” and writing. The broad stereotypes (lazy at home, industrious abroad) and tired tropes (Kerala crabs, indeed!) that the author trots out in support of his “point of view” are presented in a “Rapidex” style of writing, with non sequiturs hot on the heels of each other. My most charitable interpretation of this piece was that the author has been off his medications for a while. If this truly is what a former senior administration official believes, then I am truly depressed.

Renjith Pillai said...

Agree on the wishing part. Remaining views are of a typical Indian cosmopolitan. They are always upset with the labour class who know their rights, upset that the rickshaw drivers don't call them Sir, upset that there's not enough servants or slum dwellers.
The most ridiculous comment was the one about Keralites speaking on their own language in front of outsiders!! Get a life brother. Have u seen the French or Bengalis?

Below is a write up by SP Kelly on the cosmopolitan Indian..

Reflections on India By Sean Paul Kelley Sean Paul Kelley is a travel writer, former radio host, and before that an asset manager for a Wall Street investment bank that is still (barely) alive. He recently left a fantastic job in Singapore working for Solar Winds, a software company based out of Austin to travel around the world for a year (or two). He founded The Agonist, in 2002, which is still considered the top international affairs, culture and news destination for progressives. He is also the Global Correspondent for The Young Turks, on satellite radio and Air America .

If you are Indian, or of Indian descent, I must preface this post with a clear warning: you are not going to like what I have to say. My criticisms may be very hard to stomach. But consider them as the hard words and loving advice of a good friend. Someone who’s being honest with you and wants nothing from you.
These criticisms apply to all of India except Kerala and the places I didn’t visit, except that I have a feeling it applies to all of India ,except as I mentioned before, Kerala. Lastly, before anyone accuses me of Western Cultural Imperialism, let me say this: if this is what India and Indians want, then hey, who am I to tell them differently. Take what you like and leave the rest. In the end it doesn’t really matter, as I get the sense that Indians, at least many upper class Indians, don’t seem to care and the lower classes just don’t know any better, what with Indian culture being so intense and pervasive on the sub-continent. But here goes, nonetheless.

Renjith Pillai said...

India is a mess. It’s that simple, but it’s also quite complicated. I’ll start with what I think are India ’s four major problems–the four most preventing India from becoming a developing nation–and then move to some of the ancillary ones.

First, pollution. In my opinion the filth, squalor and all around pollution indicates a marked lack of respect for India by Indians. I don’t know how cultural the filth is, but it’s really beyond anything I have ever encountered. At times the smells, trash, refuse and excrement are like a garbage dump. Right next door to the Taj Mahal was a pile of trash that smelled so bad, was so foul as to almost ruin the entire Taj experience. Delhi , Bangalore and Chennai to a lesser degree were so very polluted as to make me physically ill. Sinus infections, ear infection, bowels churning was an all to common experience in India Dung, be it goat, cow or human fecal matter was common on the streets. In major tourist areas filth was everywhere, littering the sidewalks, the roadways, you name it. Toilets in the middle of the road, men urinating and defecating anywhere, in broad daylight. Whole villages are plastic bag wastelands. Roadsides are choked by it. Air quality that can hardly be called quality. Far too much coal and far to few unleaded vehicles on the road. The measure should be how dangerous the air is for one’s health, not how good it is. People casually throw trash in the streets, on the roads.

Renjith Pillai said...

The only two cities that could be considered sanitary in my journey were Trivandrum –the capital of Kerala–and Calicut . I don’t know why this is. But I can assure you that at some point this pollution will cut into India ’s productivity, if it already hasn’t. The pollution will hobble India ’s growth path, if that indeed is what the country wants. (Which I personally doubt, as India is far too conservative a country, in the small ‘c’ sense.)

The second issue, infrastructure, can be divided into four subcategories: roads, rails and ports and the electrical grid. The electrical grid is a joke. Load shedding is all too common, everywhere in India . Wide swaths of the country spend much of the day without the electricity they actually pay for. With out regular electricity, productivity, again, falls.

The ports are a joke. Antiquated, out of date, hardly even appropriate for the mechanized world of container ports, more in line with the days of longshoremen and the like. Roads are an equal disaster. I only saw one elevated highway that would be considered decent in Thailand , much less Western Europe or America And I covered fully two thirds of the country during my visit. There are so few dual carriage way roads as to be laughable. There are no traffic laws to speak of, and if there are, they are rarely obeyed, much less enforced. A drive that should take an hour takes three. A drive that should take three takes nine. The buses are at least thirty years old, if not older.

Renjith Pillai said...

Everyone in India , or who travels in India raves about the railway system. Rubbish. It’s awful. Now, when I was there in 2003 and then late 2004 it was decent. But in the last five years the traffic on the rails has grown so quickly that once again, it is threatening productivity. Waiting in line just to ask a question now takes thirty minutes. Routes are routinely sold out three and four days in advance now, leaving travelers stranded with little option except to take the decrepit and dangerous buses.

At least fifty million people use the trains a day in India . 50 million people! Not surprising that waitlists of 500 or more people are common now. The rails are affordable and comprehensive but they are overcrowded and what with budget airlines popping up in India like Sadhus in an ashram the middle and lowers classes are left to deal with the overutilized rails and quality suffers. No one seems to give a shit.

Seriously, I just never have the impression that the Indian government really cares. Too interested in buying weapons from Russia , Israel and the US I guess. The last major problem in India is an old problem and can be divided into two parts that’ve been two sides of the same coin since government was invented: bureaucracy and corruption.

It take triplicates to register into a hotel. To get a SIM card for one’s phone is like wading into a jungle of red-tape and photocopies one is not likely to emerge from in a good mood, much less satisfied with customer service. Getting train tickets is a terrible ordeal, first you have to find the train number, which takes 30minutes, then you have to fill in the form, which is far from easy, then you have to wait in line to try and make a reservation, which takes 30 minutes at least and if you made a single mistake on the form back you go to the end of the queue, or what passes for a queue in India.

The government is notoriously uninterested in the problems of the commoners, too busy fleecing the rich, or trying to get rich themselves in some way shape or form. Take the trash for example, civil rubbish collection authorities are too busy taking kickbacks from the wealthy to keep their areas clean that they don’t have the time, manpower, money or interest in doing their job.

Rural hospitals are perennially understaffed as doctors pocket the fees the government pays them, never show up at the rural hospitals and practice in the cities instead.

I could go on for quite some time about my perception of India and its problems, but in all seriousness, I don’t think anyone in India really cares. And that, to me, is the biggest problem. India is too conservative a society to want to change in any way.

Mumbai, India ’s financial capital is about as filthy, polluted and poor as the worst city imaginable in Vietnam , or Indonesia –and being more polluted than Medan , in Sumatra is no easy task. The biggest rats I have ever seen were in Medan !One would expect a certain amount of, yes, I am going to use this word, backwardness, in a country that hasn’t produced so many Nobel Laureates, nuclear physicists, imminent economists and entrepreneurs. But India has all these things and what have they brought back to India with them? Nothing.

The rich still have their servants, the lower castes are still there to do the dirty work and so the country remains in stasis. It’s a shame. Indians and India have many wonderful things to offer the world, but I’m far from sanguine that India will amount to much in my lifetime.

Now, have at it, call me a cultural imperialist, a spoiled child of the West and all that. But remember, I’ve been there. I’ve done it. And I’ve seen 50 other countries on this planet and none, not even Ethiopia , have as long and gargantuan a laundry list of problems as India does.

And the bottom line is, I don’t think India really cares. Too complacent and too conservative.

Vidya said...

Dear Sir,
I couldn’t agree with you more. You have reflected the heartache of numerous malayalees like me who have grown up outside Kerala. I have always loved Kerala- I think there is no other land where one is inspired by nature to this degree. No wonder it has produced some of the most brilliant artists and visionaries of the country. I am proud of my belonging here. And after all these years, when I moved back to Kerala, I see a different aspect of it now. Day-to-day life here leaves me battered and bruised, for I am constantly fighting the general attitude of society that you have described in your post. I think this is most rampant in the northern parts of the state, where politics is also at its worst.
The crab metaphor sums up the attitude. It reminds me of the insensitivity of each individual to others- an attitude reflected in the way people drive on roads, in the way people behave at workplace, in the way people use mobile phones, in the way people behave in any public place. There is no scope for teamwork. Political perspective is evident even at the grassroot level. X will help Y if this can jeopardize the relationship between X and Z. Humanitarian concerns take backseat; a political motive is at the forefront.
And then the status of women. Women have come out of their homes, no doubt. But are they truly liberated in terms of mindset? I don’t think so. It is important to realize that traditionalism and conservatism are entirely different. I would say most women have cast off their attractive coats of traditionalism and have moved instead to higher degrees of conservatism under an external façade of modern dressing. They have successfully fooled themselves into believing that they are now in par with their cosmopolitan counterparts.
English…..sigh! As anchors on screen try to imitate Ranjini Haridas’s accent and mannerism, I can’t help lamenting on the way things have taken a turn. Now, people can neither speak Malayalam nor English. Malayalam is such a rich language. I have always regretted not having learnt Malayalam in school because I realize that I am now missing out on a lot of our literature. But when I see the advertisements for spoken English all around, I feel sad at how we have regressed. People take pride in imitating an accent or slang; they have no regard for the language in the holistic sense. They no longer read books; all they seem to do is type Malayalam words in English alphabets on facebook!
Oh, I could go on endlessly about it. Not because I detest the people, but it is tragic to see them unlearning all that was beautiful and rich, in order to match up to the rest of the world. I think the infinite lust for power is at the bottom of this whole state of affairs- best exemplified by the unemployment that our government seems to encourage and perpetuate. Reading up Hitler’s autobiography helped me understand the politics of this state to a large measure. To fight this mindset, the ones who feel strongly the need for a change, will have to come together as a team and fight back equally powerfully. Our network needs to be as strong as the network of the corrupt.

Regards,
Vidya

Vidya said...

Dear Sir,
I couldn’t agree with you more. You have reflected the heartache of numerous malayalees like me who have grown up outside Kerala. I have always loved Kerala- I think there is no other land where one is inspired by nature to this degree. No wonder it has produced some of the most brilliant artists and visionaries of the country. I am proud of my belonging here. And after all these years, when I moved back to Kerala, I see a different aspect of it now. Day-to-day life here leaves me battered and bruised, for I am constantly fighting the general attitude of society that you have described in your post. I think this is most rampant in the northern parts of the state, where politics is also at its worst.
The crab metaphor sums up the attitude. It reminds me of the insensitivity of each individual to others- an attitude reflected in the way people drive on roads, in the way people behave at workplace, in the way people use mobile phones, in the way people behave in any public place. There is no scope for teamwork. Political perspective is evident even at the grassroot level. X will help Y if this can jeopardize the relationship between X and Z. Humanitarian concerns take backseat; a political motive is at the forefront.
And then the status of women. Women have come out of their homes, no doubt. But are they truly liberated in terms of mindset? I don’t think so. It is important to realize that traditionalism and conservatism are entirely different. I would say most women have cast off their attractive coats of traditionalism and have moved instead to higher degrees of conservatism under an external façade of modern dressing. They have successfully fooled themselves into believing that they are now in par with their cosmopolitan counterparts.
English…..sigh! As anchors on screen try to imitate Ranjini Haridas’s accent and mannerism, I can’t help lamenting on the way things have taken a turn. Now, people can neither speak Malayalam nor English. Malayalam is such a rich language. I have always regretted not having learnt Malayalam in school because I realize that I am now missing out on a lot of our literature. But when I see the advertisements for spoken English all around, I feel sad at how we have regressed. People take pride in imitating an accent or slang; they have no regard for the language in the holistic sense. They no longer read books; all they seem to do is type Malayalam words in English alphabets on facebook!
Oh, I could go on endlessly about it. Not because I detest the people, but it is tragic to see them unlearning all that was beautiful and rich, in order to match up to the rest of the world. I think the infinite lust for power is at the bottom of this whole state of affairs- best exemplified by the unemployment that our government seems to encourage and perpetuate. Reading up Hitler’s autobiography helped me understand the politics of this state to a large measure. To fight this mindset, the ones who feel strongly the need for a change, will have to come together as a team and fight back equally powerfully. Our network needs to be as strong as the network of the corrupt.

Regards,
Vidya

Tata SA said...

English words murdered by Keralites (Malayalees) and other Indians:

kangaroo (the worst offended word, Malayalees/Indians pronounce as “kanGAROO” instead of “KANgroo”)

mixed, fixed (pronounced as 'miksed', 'fiksed' instead of 'miksd', 'fiksd')

bear, pear, wear (pronounced as ‘biyar’, ‘piyar’, 'wiyer' instead of ‘beye’, ‘peye’, 'weye')

beer (pronounced as "biiir" instead of "biye")

auto (pronounced as "aaato" instead of "otto")

Queen (prounounced as “kyuun” instead of “kween”)

form (pronounced as ‘farum’ instead of “fom”)

biennale (pronounced as “binale” instead of “bienale”)

place names – Ohio, Seattle, Utah (pronounced as “ohiyo, seetl, ootha” instead of “ohayo, siyatl, yuta”)

Tortoise (pronounced as ‘tortois’ instead of “totis” )

turtle (pronounced as ‘turrrtil’ instead of “tutl” )

Mascot Hotel (pronounced as “muskut HOtel” instead of “MAScot hoTEL”)

heart (pronounced as ‘hurrt’ instead of “haat”)

bass (pronounced as ‘baas’ instead of “beis”)

twitter (pronounced as “tyooter” instead of “twiter”)

birthday (pronounced as “birthaday” instead of “buthdei”)

garage (pronounced as “garej” instead of “gaRAZH/gaRAJ”)

chassis (pronounced as “chasis” instead of “shasi”)

divorce (pronounced as "daiverse" instead of "divors")

February (pronounced as “fibruari” instead of “februari”)

one (pronounced as "onn" instead of "wun")

pizza (pronounced as "pisa" instead of "pitza")

our (pronounced as "avar" instead of "aue")

flour (pronounced as "flower" instead of "flaue")

alarm (prounced as "alarum" instead of "alaam")

volume (books) (pronounced as "vaalyoom' instead of "volyum")

Renjith Pillai said...

English is a foreign language. So the influence of mother tongue will always be there. Be that Chinese, german, japanese or bengali. Only the Indians who are still unable to let go their colonial hangover can find humour in that. I don't think any nationalities in the world has so much apathy to our own than us Indians. About the post.. Keralites have their drawbacks but still they are better off than their fellow countrymen. The cosmo malloos who are settled or born and brought up outside kerala should not be considered keralites. Most of them can't read or write malayalam. Their mindset is that of the average middle class Indian as explained by mr. kelly.

Tata SA said...

This is not about malayali's accent. Malayalees pronounce these words wrongly, because they are taught in the average Govt schools so. Also, the malayalam media too pronounce or write wrongly in Malayalam. Malayalis need to pronounce English better. I agree with you in 1 matter - Malayalees pronounce better than other Indians.

Tata SA said...

This is not about malayali's accent. Malayalees pronounce these words wrongly, because they are taught in the average Govt schools so. Also, the malayalam media too pronounce or write wrongly in Malayalam. Malayalis need to pronounce English better. I agree with you in 1 matter - Malayalees pronounce better than other Indians.

Tata SA said...

A simple example for pronunciation - Why is the average malayali student taught to pronounce what as 'waat' and not 'wot', all as 'aal' and not 'ol'. Why are the Malayalam newspapers, print media and TV writing as 'haal' and 'aal' in malayalam?

Tata SA said...

Why should malayalees pronounce Karl Marx as "Karrrel Maarrks" instead of "Kaal Maaks"???? Because they are taught that way!!

Tata SA said...

Why should malayalees pronounce Karl Marx as "Karrrel Maarrks" instead of "Kaal Maaks"???? Because they are taught that way!!

Renjith Pillai said...

Same reason which Delhiites pronounce iron without the r being silent..

Dea Mathew said...

I am a Malayalee and find this article very true.
Its always good to get the facts out there.

Kerala people make it impossible for people not their kind to live in the state because of their attitude.

They are famous for bragging,gossip, backstabbing.

Word THANKS does not even exist in Kerala

Jeena Kamal said...

The scene in an unreserved compartment leaving from Kerala:
The 'apparently most literate' Keralite stretches himself fully on a seat meant for 3, until the train reaches TN, when suddenly he sits up and says 'irukkanum Sarey' to the non-Keralite who was standing until then!
Literacy does not teach civility?
No matter what Keralites may tout about themselves, nobody is gonna be impressed, given such mindset!